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A/DENTRO april 04 - june 01, 2013
  • a/dentro

    a/dentro, 2013

    Stainless steel. Laser cutting. neon

  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view, 2013

  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view, 2013

  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view, 2013

  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view, 2013

  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view, 2013

  • You told me that you

    You told me that you "loved" me, 2013

    Stainless steel. Laser cutting. 100 x 100 x 7 cm.

    Ed.2+AP


  • You told me that you loved me (detail)

    You told me that you loved me (detail), 2013

    Stainless steel. Laser cutting. 100 x 100 x 7cm (x5)

    Ed.2+AP

  • I can´t stand anymore the metal inside my neck (detail)

    I can´t stand anymore the metal inside my neck (detail), 2013

    Stainless steel. Laser cutting. 100 x 100 x 7cm (x9)
    Ed.2+A

  • I can´t stand anymore the metal inside my neck (detail)

    I can´t stand anymore the metal inside my neck (detail), 2013

    Stainless steel. Laser cutting. 100 x 100 x 7cm (x9)
    Ed.2+A

  • dijiste

    dijiste, 2013

    Stainless steel. Laser cutting. 100 x 100 x 7cm
    Ed.2+A

  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view, 2013

  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view, 2013

  • Exhibition view

    Exhibition view, 2013

  • I can´t stand anymore the metal inside my neck (detail)

    I can´t stand anymore the metal inside my neck (detail), 2013

    Stainless steel. Laser cutting. 100 x 100 x 7cm (x9)
    Ed.2+A

  • I cant´t stand anymore the metal inside my neck (detail)

    I cant´t stand anymore the metal inside my neck (detail), 2013

    Stainless steel. Laser cutting. 100 x 100 x 7cm (x9)
    Ed.2+A

  • I can´t stand anymore the metal inside my neck (detail)

    I can´t stand anymore the metal inside my neck (detail), 2013

    Stainless steel. Laser cutting. 100 x 100 x 7cm (x9)
    Ed.2+A

  • I can´t stand anymore the metal inside my neck (detail)

    I can´t stand anymore the metal inside my neck (detail), 2013

    Stainless steel. Laser cutting. 100 x 100 x 7cm (x9)
    Ed.2+A

  • Inside

    Inside, 2013

    Stainless steel. Laser cutting. 100 x 100 x 7cm
    Ed.2+A

  • You told me that you loved me (detail)

    You told me that you loved me (detail), 2013

    Stainless steel. Laser cutting. 100 x 100 x 7cm (x5)
    Ed.2+AP

  • You told me that you loved me (detail)

    You told me that you loved me (detail), 2013

    Stainless steel. Laser cutting. 100 x 100 x 7cm (x5)
    Ed.2+AP

PRESS RELEASE

In/side


With his second exhibition at the gallery, Luis Amavisca (Santander, 1976) claims to return to the origins of his visual arts education at the School of the Senses. To his early adulthood, which symbolically begins with the meaning of pain and love. However, this is more like a revisiting, in which photography and video give way to some pieces that have more to do with minimalism and conceptualism, owing to the chosen format: the clean wound in steel and the word. In this project each piece situates us in the interior of the exhibition; in the interior of the space (of the work and the gallery); in the interior of the artist and the interior of the spectator.


The employment of objects in his work is nothing new. Objects with a use insinuated in the titles—Lámparas de plegaria (Prayer Lamps), Mobiliario de inocencia (Furniture of Innocence) and Módulos de Katharsis (Catharsis Modules)—in which photography and video were very relevant, and that on this occasion are the mere conveyors of characters open on their surface, shaping a word. The means of communication is language but the medium simply and definitively emphasizes the meaning and purpose of the message, which now appears in its essence, as the end of a purifying process initiated beforehand. Steel, an industrial material, receives the word as a wound in its body, as the wall could have received it if it had enabled the same result and portability. Instead, the steel parallelepipeds seem to be the optimal alternative. The artist expresses his adhesion to the Vitruvian method, departing from the three suppositions that the Roman theorist considered essential in fabricating architecture: durability, usefulness and beauty. The word incarnates a voluminous format, with a certain architectural disposition, given the interior space that is created. Thus, the pieces ultimately take on a clearly sculptural nature, the intentionality of which is disclosed by the highlighting of the pieces and the laser cut letters, which, furthermore, are shown in negative and positive. The geometry structures the statement of propositions that bring order to the emotional chaos, freeing it from any personal mark that might impede the universalization of its meanings. The association of geometry and system ties this work to the poetics of Sol Lewitt, who, like Mondrian, Albers and some Latin American artists, put faith in it, protected by polychrome, like Donald Judd, as a rationalizing discipline of the universe. Like Art and Language, Robert Barry, and Kosuth, he equates the word to any other element of expression in the visual arts.

After a first phase, with the multiple movements followed by the conceptual artists, there is so much flexibility that it is impossible to make a clear classification. Still, there are few concessions to aesthetics and these are limited to the use of colour or the way of arranging the words, and little else, at least, regarding those who support his discourse in the language—Lawrence Weiner, v.g. Luis Amavisca reduces both resources to minimums; the suggested arrangement is linear and simple and the medium is presented bare or in red. Other licenses are permitted, such as the poetic nuance of the suggested sentences, accentuated by the reiteration of some words to imprint rhythm and emphasize the effectiveness of each one separately rather than only within a group, whatever the grouping may be. His proposal does not involve the hieroglyphic, as does Brossa’s, but the ambivalence of meanings and signifiers. Thus, red symbolizes passion, but it is also the colour of blood, evocative of pain and tragedy; You told me you loved me: Do you still love me or not? Was it true at the time or were you lying then? One word is equally effective in two different languages—adentro/inside—in the manner of Weiner. There are overlapping levels of representation—metal and the word metal—as in Joseph Kosuth. There is parallelism between the artist’s body and the physicality of the work, the two wounds, and the very space of the gallery, in both cases with metal on the interior. There is polysemic employment of material, metal: a material with which one wounds, cuts, damages and kills oneself, yet also sews, repairs, restores and cures oneself…Therefore, two levels, the physical and the spiritual, are fully identified. The artist unflinchingly compels us to take an active stance, to get involved, when it comes to perceiving the work, as Kosuth indicates, in order to make art a detonator of analysis, of intellectual exercise, with its inseparably playful component.

In A/dentro (In/side), Luis Amavisca establishes an Aristotelian balance between the rational and the sensorial, without renouncing his empathy for the increased opening up of the mechanisms of response to stimuli and application of the feminine. This is a sober project, of formally moderate content and impeccable technical rigor, a counterweight to the emotion displayed—bear in mind the conceptual artists such as Fina Miralles, Ana Mendieta, Bas Jan Ader and all Body Art and Performance Art. In an act of profound generosity, to the extent that his is autobiography, he offers us a representation of feeling at the limit, naked and with all its crudity, yet also a conveyor of the immense beauty of sincerity, of truth. It is, besides, an act of courage, of rebellion, not in the realm of politics—as opposed to one of the most common trends in Spanish conceptual art: Muntadas, Abad and Pedro G Romero—but against the politically correct, against the dictates of discretion that constrain our manifestations. It is a categorical reaffirmation of his reality as a person conditioned by some physical and sentimental circumstances that he wishes to express openly with this silent cry of pain.

IH







 

© 2011 Isabel Hurley